What is Sorghum?

Sorghum packs healthy benefits in every grain. The super grain is high in protein, rich in antioxidants and naturally gluten-free. Plus, whole grain sorghum helps keep you fuller longer and provides beneficial dietary fiber for digestive health.

Sorghum grain can be served like rice or quinoa. You can prepare sorghum as a delicious side dish or as the base for a main meal. Try sorghum for breakfast, lunch, dinner and even snacks your whole family will love.

The grain is easy to cook using your oven, stovetop, slow cooker or rice cooker. Sorghum can even be frozen and then reheated without losing its great taste.

Forms of Sorghum

Several varieties of sorghum grow in the U.S., but tan or white food-grade sorghum is most commonly used in the food industry. Take a look at the many fabulous forms of sorghum you can use for your cooking and baking needs.

Whole Grain

A good source of fiber and protein that adds a hearty, nutty flavor to your favorite recipes. Add whole grain sorghum to salads, cooked dishes, snacks and more to meet the daily servings of whole grains in your diet.

Pearled Grain

Created by removing the outside layer or hull of the whole grain sorghum kernels. Pearled grain has slightly less protein and fiber than pearled grain because the hull is removed. It has a softer bite and can be used in stews, as a salad garnish or in many other creative dishes.

Whole Grain Sorghum Flour

Milled with the entire grain, including the hull, making it a good source of protein and fiber in your baked goods. The flour has a neutral flavor and light color, and can be used with other flours in a variety of baking methods.

White Sorghum Flour

Milled without the whole grain hull, much like traditional flours. The flour has a neutral flavor and light color and can be used with other flours in a variety of baking methods.

Popped Sorghum

Whole grain sorghum can be popped like popcorn into small, white kernels. Popped sorghum is a low calorie, nutrient-packed addition to snack bars and granola or used as a garnish on salads, desserts and more.

Sorghum Syrup

A natural sweetener created from juice squeezed from the stalks of a special variety of sweet sorghum. The syrup has a rich, dark color and consistency similar to molasses but with a milder taste. Plus, sorghum syrup is lower in fructose levels than other sweeteners and is high in potassium. Sorghum syrup is tasty over your favorite biscuits or pancakes but also makes a great addition to barbecue marinades, salad dressings, granolas and premium spirits.

Black Sorghum

A specialty type of sorghum most often used in the food industry. The grain contains high levels of antioxidants and phytochemicals that have shown potential health benefits.

Sorghum Bran

Available in burgundy, black and sumac varieties. These types of sorghum are rich in antioxidants and high in fiber. Sorghum bran adds a nutritional punch to baked goods, shakes, blended seasonings and more.

Flaked Sorghum

Flaked sorghum makes an excellent addition to breakfast cereals, energy bars, cookies and granola snacks.